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Spring Plant Sale to benefit Sycamore Land Trust's Native Plant Nursery

Spring Plant Sale to benefit Sycamore Land Trust’s Native Plant Nursery

Saturday, May 11, 2024  9am – 2pm (while supplies last) at Bloomingfoods East (3220 E 3rd Street, Bloomington)

We’re delighted to announce our second annual Spring Native Plant Sale! Proceeds from the sale will be used to support our Native Plant Nursry, where we grow native plants for our many land restoration projects in South Cental Indiana. We will offer native plants that thrive in a garden setting and that provide vital habitat and food for our pollinators, birds, and small mammals. Please stop by and chat with us about adding more native plants to your backyard in support of wildlife. A pot return area will be available through June. Come early for the best selection!

Illustrations by Ellen Bergan

Available Native Species

 

NATIVE PLANT COMMON NAME CULTURAL REQUIREMENTS BENEFITS TO WILDLIFE NATIVE COUNTIES NATIVE TO MONROE CO.?
Agastache scrophulariifolia Giant Purple Hyssop Purple flower spikes bloom July to October on 2-6′ plants. Full to partial sun and medium to dry soils. This plant’s nectar and tall flowers attract many pollinators, including skipper butterflies, honeybees, and the endangered Rusty Patched Bumblebee. Owen, Brown No
Allium cernuum Nodding Wild Onion Pink flowers bloom on 1-2′ plants in late summer. Prefer full sun and dry soil. Preferred by many pollinators, especially the Cellophane Bees. Monroe and surrounding Yes
Asclepias incarnata Swamp Milkweed Pink flowers bloom July to August on 3-4′ plants. Full sun and medium to wet soils. Host plant for the monarch butterfly and source of nectar for many other butterflies. Monroe and surrounding Yes
Asclepias syriaca Common Milkweed Pink flowers bloom June to August on 2-3′ plants. Full sun and medium to dry soils. Host plant for the monarch butterfly and source of nectar for many other butterflies. Monroe and surrounding Yes
Asclepias tuberosa Butterfly Milkweed Yellow/orange blooms June to August on 1.5-2′ plants. Full sun, dry to average water needs. Deer resistant. Important nectar source for many butterflies. Important larval host plant for monarch butterfly caterpillars. Monroe and surrounding Yes
Blephilia ciliata Downy Woodmint Tiers of purple flowers bloom May to August on 1-1.5′ plants. Full to partial sun and dry to medium soils. The flower’s nectar attracts many pollinators, including honeybees, butterflies, and skippers. Monroe and surrounding Yes
Blephilia hirsuta Hairy Woodmint Tiers of blue-purple flowers bloom May-September on 1-2.5′ plants. Full sun to partial shade, medium water needs. The flower’s nectar attracts many pollinators, including honeybees, butterflies, and skippers. Monroe and surrounding Yes
Carex crinita Fringed Sedge Drooping spikelets bloom May-June on 2-3′ plants. Full sun to partial shade, medium to wet water needs. Deer resistant. Attracts many native insects, including caterpillars and sedge grasshoppers. The tasty seeds also attract many wetland birds. Monroe and surrounding Yes
Carex muskingumensis Palm Sedge Bright green foliage with green to brown summer seed heads on 2-3′ plants. Full to partial sun and medium to very wet soils. Many wetland birds feed on the seeds of this plant while the foliage caters to caterpillars and squirrels. Lawrence, Jackson, Bartholomew No
Chasmanthium latifolium Inland Oats Drooping, oat-like seed spikelets on 2-4′ plants in mid summer. Known to spread aggressively. Prefer part shade to shade and moist to average soil. Deer resistant. The wind-pollinated flowers attract few insects, however the caterpillars of the northern pearly eye butterfly and several species of skippers feed on the foliage and the seeds may be eaten by songbirds and small mammals. Greene, Owen, Lawrence, Jackson Yes
Cirsium discolor Field Thistle Large purple flower heads bloom in late summer and early fall on 2-8′ plants. Full sun and medium to wet soils. Attracts many visitors including Monarch and Painted Lady butterflies, Eastern Goldfinches, and hummingbirds. Monroe and surrounding Yes
Clematis virginiana Virgin’s Bower Vine plant with fragrant white flowers that bloom August to October. Full to partial sun and medium to wet soils. Deer resistant. This plant’s branches provide spaces for songbirds to hide and build their nests. Greene, Lawrence No
Conoclinium coelestinum Blue Mist Flower Fuzzy blue blooms July to October on 1.5-3′ plants. Full sun to partial shade, average water needs. Deer resistant. Attracts birds, bees and is a magnet for late season butterflies. Very adaptable plant that spreads rapidly. Monroe and surrounding Yes
Coreopsis lanceolata Lance Leaf Coreopsis Daisy like yellow blooms March-July on 1.5-2′ plants. Full sun to part sun, average to dry soils. Of special value to butterflies and native bees. Goldfinches and other small songbirds feast on the seed heads. Provides early blooms for pollinators in spring. Monroe, Lawrence Yes
Echinacea purpurea Purple Coneflower Pink/purple flowers in July on 3-4′ plants. Full sun and average soil. The cone shape makes pollen and nectar easily accessible to bees, moths, and butterflies like the Eastern Tiger Swallowtail Butterfly. Attractive to goldfinches and other songbirds that will eat the seeds. Davies and south No
Elymus hystrix Bottle Brush Grass Bottlebrush-like seedheads form early on 2-4′ plants. Part shade to shade, dry to average water needs. Deer resistant. Seedheads attract birds. A larval host plant for the northern pearly eye butterfly and several species of moths. Monroe and surrounding Yes
Eupatorium perfoliatum Common Boneset Clustered white flowers late summer on 3-5′ plants. Full sun and moist soils. Deer resistant. The nectar or pollen of the flowers attracts many kinds of insects, including bees, flies, wasps, butterflies, and beetles. Monroe and surrounding Yes
Helenium autumnale Common Sneezeweed Yellow daisy like blooms July – October on 3-5′ plants. Prefers full sun and wet soils. Deer resistant. Common visitors are bumblebees, long-horned bees, cuckoo bees and leaf-cutting bees. Other visitors include butterflies, and beetles. Monroe and surrounding Yes
Hypericum punctatum Spotted St. Johnswort Groups of yellow flowers bloom mid-summer on 1-2.5′ plants. Full to partial sun and wet soils. Attracts many pollinators, including bumble bees, and provides a home for moth larvae. Monroe and surrounding Yes
Liatris scariosa Northern Blazingstar

 

Fluffy purple flowers bloom August to October on 2-4′ plants. Full sun and dry to medium soil. These flowers attract all kinds of pollinators, including hummingbirds and butterflies. Songbirds will also visit to snack on the seeds. Lawrence, Jackson, Brown No
Lobelia cardinalis Cardinal Flower Red blooms July to September on 2-4′ plants. Full sun to part shade, wet to average water needs. Attracts hummingbirds and some species of swallowtail butterflies. Monroe and surrounding Yes
Monarda fistulosa Wild Bergamot Purple flowers bloom late summer on 2-5′ plants. Plant parts have an herbal aroma reminiscent of oregano. Prefer full sun and average to dry soil. Deer resistant. Attracts bumble bees, butterflies, moths, and hummingbirds. Monroe and surrounding Yes
Oligoneuron riddellii Riddell’s Goldenrod Golden yellow blooms in September on 2-3′ plants. Prefers full sun and wet soils. Attracts an amazing variety of moths, butterflies, beetles, beneficial wasps, leaf hoppers, midges, and flies. Morgan, scattered south and north No
Panicum virgatum Switchgrass Reddish branched spikelets bloom in mid-summer on 3-4′ plants.  Full sun to partial shade and medium to wet soils. Seeds attract birds in the winter months. Monroe and surrounding Yes
Penstemon digitalis Smooth Penstemon White flowers with purple lines blooming on 2-3′ plants in early summer. Prefer full to partial sun and average soil. The purple lines on these flowers direct insects to the nectar inside the tubular flower. Inside this tube, you can find a wide variety of bees. Also an early blooming favorite of hummingbirds. Monroe and surrounding Yes
Pycnanthemum virginianum Mountain Mint White flower with purple spots, blooms in late summer on 2-3′ plants. Plant parts have a minty fragrance. Full to part sun, wet to average soils. Deer resistant. Purple spots and floral arrangement attract nectar-seeking insects like bumble bees and the Banded Hairstreak Butterfly. Monroe and surrounding Yes
Rudbeckia laciniata Cutleaf Coneflower Yellow, daisy-like flowers bloom in July on 2-9’ plants. Full to partial sun and average water needs. Deer resistant. These tall coneflowers are shaped to provide easy access to pollinators, including bees, moths, and butterflies. Monroe and surrounding Yes
Schizachyrium scoparium Little Bluestem Upright blue-green foliage and silvery-white seed heads beginning in June and persisting through winter on 3-5′ plants. Full sun to part shade, dry soils. Deer resistant. Larval host to many different skippers. Attracts butterflies and birds. Excellent habitat for birds and small mammals. Greene, Martin, Lawrence No
Scutellaria incana Downy Skullcap Purple tubular flowers bloom July to September on 2-3′ plants. Full to partial sun and dry to medium soils. Deer resistant A preferred flower to bumble bees, but also visited by skipper butterflies. Monroe and surrounding Yes
Silene regia Royal Catchfly

 

Red tubular flowers during a long mid summer season on 2-3′ plants. Prefers full sun to partial sun and dry to average soils. Attracts hummingbirds and the Black Swallowtail Butterfly. Greene present but rare, scattered South No
Silphium perfoliatum Cup Plant Yellow daisy like blooms in mid summer on 6-8′ plants. Strong grower that spreads aggressively. Prefers full sun to partial shade, wet to average soils. Deer resistant Named for the water caught in the cup-like leaves, which may entice birds and other critters for a drink. The seeds are eaten by various types of birds. Many pollinators visit the flowers including butterflies, skippers, moths, and a diversity of bees. Monroe and surrounding Yes
Solidago caesia Blue Stem Goldenrod Arching yellow flowers bloom August to September on 1.5-3′ plants. Full to partial sun and dry to medium soils. Deer resistant A wide variety of insects visit the flowers for pollen and nectar, including bees, wasps, flies, butterflies, moths, and beetles. Birds will forage the seeds in winter. Monroe and surrounding Yes
Sorghastrum nutans Indian Grass Gold spikelets bloom in early fall on 3-5′ plants. Full sun and dry to medium soil. A preferred host plant to many grasshoppers, the tall grasses also provide a nesting place for birds. Greene, Lawrence No
Symphyotrichum cordifolium Woodland Aster Blooms may range in color from blue to white on 1-3′ plants in fall. Prefers partial sun and average to dry soils. This late flowering aster provides much needed nectar to a variety of insects, including bees, butterflies, skippers, and beetles. Caterpillars of several species of butterflies and moths feed on the foliage. Monroe and surrounding Yes
Symphyotrichum novae-angliae New England Aster Purple flower that blooms in the fall on 2-6′ plants. Full to partial sun and average to wet soils. The contrasting purple and orange on this plant attracts many butterflies and moths, with the flat shape of the flower acting as a landing pad for visitors. Monroe, Greene Yes
Zizia aurea Golden Alexander Yellow umbrella-shaped clusters of flowers in spring on 1-1.5” plants. Full sun to partial shade, moist to average soils. Host plant for the black swallowtail butterfly, the flowers are attractive to bees and other pollinators. Provides early blooms for pollinators in spring. Greene, Owen No

References:

http://www.missouribotanicalgarden.org/plantfinder/plantfindersearch.aspx
https://www.illinoiswildflowers.info/
http://www.bonap.org/MapKey.html
Pollinators of Native Plants; Heather Holm, Pollination Press, 2014

 

 

Gardening with Native Plants

“Butterflies used to reproduce on the native plants that grew in our yards before the plants were bulldozed and replaced with lawn. To have butterflies in our future, we need to replace those lost host plants, no if’s, and’s or but’s. If we do not, butterfly populations will continue to decline with every new house that is built.”

Douglas Tallamy

The following guidelines will help you turn your backyards into havens for birds, butterflies, insects and other backyard wildlife.

Plant with Wildlife in Mind

  • Choose native plants in your ecoregion instead of non natives.  Native plants are more recognizable as food sources to wildlife and are best suited to thrive in your garden.
  • Plant in layers, recognizing the importance of trees and shrubs as a food source and home for insects, birds, and small mammals. Grow large areas of one kind of native plant so it is easily recognizable to the wildlife seeking it out. Include bloom times in spring, summer and fall extending the availability of food and habitat. 
  • If possible provide a water source, preferably on the ground so that toads, turtles, squirrels and other small mammals have access.  

Avoid Pesticides

  • When nature is left undisturbed by human intervention it will normally find balance, for example, most insects provide vital food for birds to feed their young. Pesticides, even organics, kill good bugs and bad bugs alike. This includes routine commercial spraying for pests on trees and turf, and spraying for mosquitos in yards. 
  • Native plants do not need fertilization once established as they are adapted to the soils in the planting region. Young first year plants will benefit from supplemental watering especially during dry spells until their extensive root systems are fully developed. 

Provide Shelter for Wildlife

  • Delay garden cleanup until late spring, providing ample time for insects, their eggs, and larvae to come out of hibernation in dead stalks and fallen leaves. 
  • By not deadheading spent flowers the seeds become necessary food for birds and small mammals, and provide next year’s seedlings increasing the density of the planting area.  
  • Consider adding a rock pile, bare dirt pile or log pile to your garden to further provide necessary shelter and habitat to raise the next generation of wildlife in your yard.    

References:

Indianawildlife.org
IndianaNativePlants.org
Bringing Nature Home; Doug Tallamy, Timber Press, 2009

Click here to download this handout (PDF).

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